Well Dined

7Mar/160

Spam and Rice Bowl

Well Dined | Spam and Rice Bowl

I had always thought that spam was super gross and never had any interest.  But as I became more aware of the different cuisines of the world, I noticed that there were a few that really (REALLY) love spam.  So when I saw spam musubi on the menu at my favorite local cafe, Megabytes, I decided to try it.  You guys - spam is delicious!  It's like ham plus bacon plus sausage all in one.  I'm kind of obsessed now, like bought-a-case-at-Costco obsessed.  No, processed meat is not good for you; but as a special treat in the place of bacon or sausage, it's not going to kill you (probably).  Especially if you buy the low sodium kind, which I prefer.

Anyway, pressing musubi seems like a lot of work, and I am more of a freeform girl; so I decided to make a rice bowl for my first spam experiment.  I cooked short grain rice and topped it with furikake seasoning, then seared spam, fried eggs, seaweed, scallions, and toasted sesame seeds.  It. Was. Awesome.  I wasn't sure that Jasper would be into it, but he loved it, too, and wants me to make it all the time!

Spam and Rice Bowl
serves 2-4

1 1/2 cups dry short grain rice (I use Botan)
2 cups water
1/4 cup furikake seasoning (check your labels, not all furikake is gluten free)
1 can low sodium spam, sliced into 8 slices
4 eggs
salt and pepper
toasted nori
scallion greens, sliced
toasted sesame seeds

Combine the rice and water and cook according to directions, usually simmer covered for 20 minutes, then let stand for 10 (I use a rice cooker).  Fluff with a fork and add the furikake seasoning, you can start with less and more to taste, if you wish.  Set aside.

Meanwhile, sear the sliced spam on each side in a nonstick pan over medium-high heat.  You won't need any extra fat, and you may have to work in batches.  Set aside.

Pour out most of the fat from the pan, then return to medium heat and fry the eggs you your liking.  I prefer sunny side up.  Season the eggs with salt and pepper.

To assemble divide the rice among the desired number of bowls, top with the spam, then the eggs.  Sprinkle nori, scallions, and sesame over the top.  Enjoy!

One Year Ago - Lentil Salad with Walnuts and Herbs
Two Years Ago - S'mores Treats
Three Years Ago - Turkey and Sweet Potato Shepherd's Pie
Four Years Ago - Beef, Sweet Potato, Spinach, and Cheddar Turnovers
Five Years Ago - Couscous Dinners

23Aug/132

Summer Tartines

Well Dined | Summer Tartines

So for the past few weeks I have pretty much been living off of fresh summer produce and cheese piled onto whole grain seed bread.  It's pretty much all I want to eat.  EVER.  The French call these open-faced sandwiches "tartines".  I like that, it makes them sound fancy (when really they are super simple).

Well Dined | Fresh Tomato and Ricotta Tartine

The farmers' market has been bursting with huge, gorgeous heirloom tomatoes.  This beautiful yellow, green, and red tomato made it onto pizza (which I will post about soon) AND some lovely tartines.  I wanted to eat some of this super sweet and juicy tomato raw so I toasted some bread and topped it with creamy homemade ricotta, basil from my garden, slices of tomato, high quality EVOO, high quality sea salt, and fresh cracked pepper.  Super simple and sooooooo delicious.

Well Dined | Fig, Ricotta, and Honey Tartine

Next up I paired some fresh figs with more of that homemade ricotta, black pepper, and honey.  Whether for lunch, dessert, or a snack - this tartine is awesome.

Well Dined | Broiled Tomato and Mozzarella Tartines

Lastly, I wanted to experiment with warm tartines and broiled tomatoes, so I placed sliced mozzarella and tomatoes on seedy whole grain bread, drizzled them with olive oil, and broiled them.  Then I topped them with fresh basil, salt, and pepper - yum!  Definitely very satisfying.

What are some of your favorite tartine ideas?  Leave them in the comments!